Welcome, %1$s. Please login or register.

Login with username, password and session length
Podcast # 888 is now up covering my new PC build.
 
collapse

* Weekly Trek Pic

click to see larger

* Recent Pics

tsf8920.png
Posted by: Rico
tsf8910.png
Posted by: Rico
tsf8900.png
Posted by: Rico
tsf8890.png
Posted by: Rico
tsf8880.png
Posted by: Rico

* Facebook Group

click to see group on Facebook

* Paypal Donations

Donate via Paypal
Subscribe via Paypal

* Links & Info

Treks in Sci-Fi

Attic of my Mind

Job for a Hero

Voicemail: (641) 715-3900 ext: 472366

Author Topic: How is everyone doing?  (Read 6017 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Offline Jen

  • Global Moderator
  • Fleet Admiral
  • *
  • Posts: 4835
  • Like a Jedi Rock Star
    • Anomaly Podcast
    • Email
Re: How is everyone doing?
« Reply #30 on: April 29, 2007, 07:58:02 AM »
All we need now is for him to be born, and for the birth-mother to walk out of the hospital without him.


The one catch is that there is a "legal risk" window between birth and finalization of the termination of parental rights.  That takes 3 - 6 weeks.  He will be in foster care for the duration of the legal risk window just in case our birth-mother changes her mind.

If all goes well, we will bring him home no later than August 1st.  The adoption will be finalized 6 months after his birth-date.

Wow, what a stressful situation. Lots of mixed emotions involved I'm sure. Dave and I have talked and if we end up adopting, I think we want to adopt a toddler. I wonder if the same legal risk window is present if the child isn't a new born. I hope everything turns out for the best. Good luck IC.
Founding co-host of the Anomaly Podcast
AnomalyPodcast.com
@AnoamlyPodcast

Offline The IC

  • Commander
  • *
  • Posts: 190
    • Email
Re: How is everyone doing?
« Reply #31 on: April 30, 2007, 11:00:56 AM »
the legal risk window varies from state to state and situation to situation

We live in WI, which means that the birth-mother can legally re-acquire custody her child after she has signed the termination of parental rights (TPR), if she does this before a judge signs the TPR.  That process takes about a month.  In IL, for example, the mother loses custody of a child the moment she signs her TPR.


We found out over the weekend that the birth-father has disappeared, which means that our agency has to run his name in the paper for 3 consecutive days for him to come forward.  Our social worker said that the judge may not require them to do that, since he is very aware of the pregnancy, and has discussed it with the agency.

 




Enterprise © Bloc